Let’s adopt a hybrid model! Hybrid learning is the way ahead for schools!

We keep hearing such statements in regards to school reopening these days. Before jumping on the bandwagon, let’s deep dive into “hybrid learning”..

Most common hybrid learning definition is combining the online and face-to-face learning options, offering “best of both worlds” in a structured and purposeful manner.

Hybrid learning in schools can be implemented in multiple ways, depending on the hybrid learning model a school opts for!

Physical-virtual in parallel

If all parents are unwilling to send children initially, then this will be the first and most obvious choice, where some students join live classes virtually, while others join from school. Here, the school hours can be shortened and asynchronous learning through online assignments, much similar to the current virtual model.

Challenges

  • How to best manage in-person and virtual learning at once?
  • How to plan synchronous lesson delivery and engage all students when half are present virtually?

Helpful strategies:

  • Schedule individual as well as small group calls with remote students periodically. Some time towards the end of each day can be kept to give personalized attention to remote students and gather their feedback.
  • Remain consistent in regards to course logistics – where/how students will submit assignments, organization of online content, etc.
  • Set clear expectations about attendance and participation in both face-to-face and online environments.
  • Continue using LMS as a repository of all learning materials as a backup.

Rotational school visits

If the majority of parents are supportive of physical classes, then this model is quite effective and balanced. Each class can be split into two learning groups in an AA/BB schedule rotation – each group of students will learn in-person at their schools two/three days a week and online two/three days a week.

The virtual group can be managed by another teacher through a video call or they can do asynchronous learning at their own pace.

This hybrid model will give equal opportunity for face-to-face interactions with peers and teachers, to all students on a rotation basis.

Schools can choose to keep one “complete virtual” day, for sanitization and fumigation purposes and the rotation continues for the rest 4 days.

  • How do you plan your lesson when students come to school only a few times a week?
  • How to plan and assess asynchronous learning for students?

Helpful strategies:

Do detailed and structured syllabus planning defining which learning activities or assessments would be best in online mode and which would be more effective in a face-to-face format.

Flip the classroom – it is a great way to maintain instructional momentum.

Plan asynchronous learning in a way that it maximizes synchronous learning –  students can watch a video on remote days, do individual assignments, then come and apply their knowledge in the classroom and participate in a super-interactive synchronous session like a debate on the video, presentation on the lesson prepared, or a related group task.

Station-rotation is a great hybrid learning strategy!

Students here are distributed across multiple stations for teacher-led instruction, collaborative activities and asynchronous learning. This strategy can be employed in both the models mentioned above.

In school, students rotate between a teacher-led station and a group station; and at home, students work on individual materials at one station and attend group calls with their peers in another.

This strategy helps teachers divide their time across “in person” and “remote” students quite efficiently.

Top 5 practices to conduct impeccable hybrid classes

  1. Blended learning pedagogy:

Use technology potential to enhance both the physical and virtual learning experiences. Analytics can be instrumental in personalizing instructions.

  1. Integrate the experiences:

Both the online and face-to-face components should complement each other and work in sync to achieve the learning goals.

  1. Backward lesson planning:

Identify the lesson goals and assessments and then, decide about the class schedule and activities – whether in person or at home.

  1. Thoughtful Delivery:

Ensure remote students can see and hear clearly. Position devices and project screens appropriately, to ensure continuous involvement of remote students.

5. Student-centered approach:

Encourage students to take ownership of their learning. Enable and guide them to monitor and reflect on their learning.

Teachers,

We know, adapting to the hybrid model is a daunting challenge for you and students, but we are champs at adapting now, aren’t we?

Lesson planning is the differentiator!

Gathering feedback at every step is critical!

Overcome all hurdles with meticulous planning and efficient strategies!

Education delivery platforms like Classroom.live can help you conduct super-engaging hybrid classes through its rich set of features. Explore it for sure to experience the incredible transformation it can bring to your classroom!

Embrace “hybrid learning”!

Make classroom.live your partner in your journey from online to hybrid!